dining · Fine Dining · Food · Krakow · Lifestyle · Location · Restaurants

Krakow

We thought we would broaden our horizons, and for no apparent reason, decided on a visit to Poland. So, why there?

Kraków, a city in Southern Poland. near the border with the Czech Republic, is known for its well-preserved medieval core and Jewish quarter. Its old town – ringed by Planty Park and remnants of the city’s medieval walls – is centered on the stately, expansive Rynek Glówny (market square). This plaza is the site of the Cloth Hall with its underground museum, a Renaissance-era trading outpost, and St. Mary’s Basilica, a stately 14th-century Gothic church.

Expecting snow, we thought it might be a romantic picture postcard setting and relief from our incessant wind, rain and the grey skies in our part of the country. With the overall cost of the hotel and airfare being quite reasonable and it only being 5 hours door to door, food, trips and drinks quite cheap, we were more than pleasantly surprised with our choice.

How do you pronounce Krakow? I’ve still no idea. Google (which is NEVER wrong… is it!?) suggests it is pronounced as it is spelt – ending in ‘cow’. Locals often pronounce it with an ‘ov’ sound at the end. To further complicate matters, there are at least 5 different spellings of the name. So you choose.

What to do there

The biggest draw has to be the city itself. With its magnificent central square, fantastic restaurants, fairy tale castle and river views, beautiful walks, shop till you drop, the exhibitions, the wonderful architecture, and not forgetting the hospitable English-speaking locals, it’s hard to pick out a favourite. We took a trip under the central Cloth Hall to explore the underground museum taking us back to Krakow seven hundred years ago. The Cloth Hall itself is still home to market stalls selling everything you never thought you needed, such as chess sets, furry hats, local amber jewellery and other souvenirs.

If you’re into churches, museums and living history, you can’t go wrong. Go for a leisurely coach ride from the square or a city sightseeing tour by ‘tuk tuk’ to the Jewish Quarter. Or, just a ten minute walk away is the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Wawel Royal Castle, one of the largest in Poland, and representing nearly all European architectural styles. Further afield the salt mine is well worth a visit. A word of warning though – the mine has two lots of downward steps totalling around 800 and even though you only walk one percent of the 150 km of tunnels its still a lot of walking so you need to be reasonably fit to venture down. There is an underground cafe there so for us Brits a nice cup of tea was beckoning, however the tour didn’t factor in time for one and we didn’t want to miss the lift that carries you back to the top.

Images of the history and associated atrocities of WW2 are around every corner in the city and a stark reminder of how the Poles and the Jewish community suffered. Take a walk into the Jewish quarter and check out the architecture and streets that never change, and behind every facade and street corner there are echoes of a much darker time that must never be repeated. Which brings me round to the prickly mention of the concentration camps of Auschwitz and Birkenau right on Krakow’s doorstep. This is a major destination and a must-see. Whatever your thoughts are on the subject, just go, and please don’t ask me why you should. The guide will show you around buildings, still hauntingly intact, and echoing with the unimaginable horrors of the holocaust. You’ll learn of man’s inhumanity to man committed within these sombre concrete walls and miles of cruel barbed wire. Close your eyes for a minute in the silence and try to imagine how it must have been, and you too will experience the prevailing sadness, despair and bitter anger. Leave there, get back on the coach you will ask yourself why it all happened, and why you went to visit. Tough questions you won’t be able to answer.

The food

As this is principally a food blog by nature, what is traditional Polish food, I hear you ask? Poles boast that their two basic products are bread and sausages. And the most typical ingredients used in Polish cuisine are sauerkraut, beetroot, cucumbers (gherkins), sour cream, kohlrabi, mushrooms, sausages and smoked sausage. Pork is very popular in all its forms. A meal owes its taste to the herbs and spices used; such as marjoram, dill, caraway seeds, parsley, or pepper. The most popular desserts are cakes and pastries. A shot of vodka is an appropriate addition to meals and help you to digest the food. The main square and all roads leading to it are lined with fabulous traditional restaurants specialising in Polish cooking, as well as restaurants serving Italian, French and Asian foods, vegetarian and vegan bars. And on every corner you’ll find a bagel stand.

Lots of fish served here that includes Pike-perch, salmon, trout and cod. Go down to the Jewish Quarter for the finest fish dishes on offer.

Here are a few Polish specialities.

Bigos

Traditionally a winter dish, Bigos is a hearty stew . Though there is no standard recipe, ingredients usually include lots of fresh and pickled cabbage, leftover meat parts and sausage, onion, mushrooms, garlic and whatever else is on hand. In fact, metaphorically Bigos translates to ‘big mess’ in Polish.

Golabki

Translating to ‘little pigeons,’ this favourite dish consists of boiled cabbage leaves stuffed with beef, onion and rice before being baked and served in a tomato or mushroom sauce.

Golonka

Pork knuckle or hock, as in pig’s thigh – boiled, braised, or generally roasted and put before you on a plate. A true Polish delicacy, the meat should slip right off the bone, be served with horseradish, and washed down with beer. Not my favourite but…

Kotlet Schabowy

Probably the most popular lunch in Poland is the almighty ‘schabowy’ with mashed potatoes and pickled cabbage, and you can walk into almost restaurant in the country and they’ll have some form of it. Essentially a breaded and fried pork chop, ‘kotlet schabowy’ is quite similar to Viennese schnitzel.

Pierogi

Doughy dumplings traditionally filled with potato, sweet cheese, meat, mushrooms and cabbage, strawberries or plums, and if you nose around you will find plenty of different fillings like broccoli, chocolate or liver as the possibilities are truly limitless and they are served almost everywhere in the city. A great Polish favourite.

Zupa (Soup)

Poland has three signature soups: barszcz, żurek and flaki. A nourishing beetroot soup, barszcz may be served with potatoes and veggies tossed in, with a croquette or miniature pierogi floating in it, or simply as broth in a mug expressly for drinking (‘barszcz solo’). A recommended alternative to other beverages with any winter meal, we’d be surprised if you can find a bad cup of barszcz anywhere in Kraków. It doesn’t get any more Polish than żurek – a unique sour rye soup with sausage, potatoes and occasionally with egg, and often served in a bread bowl. If you’re of strong constitution and feeling truly adventurous, try flaki – beef tripe soup enriched with veggies, herbs and spices.

Poland’s culture has always integrated elements from its neighbours, and there are also many recipes of Jewish origin. Nowadays the Polish menu is still changing, being influenced by various, sometimes exotic tastes.

For the less adventurous there is also delicious steak, sushi bars, fabulous chicken dishes, many vege and vegan restaurants, bagels on street corners AND, don’t forget, the ubiquitous KFC and Macdonalds. It’s all here, and at very reasonable, and sometimes unbelievable, prices. Visit the Cyrano De Bergerac restaurant for a fine dining experience at a price that won’t break the bank. But venture off the beaten track for some pleasant surprises.

A few of our travel tips:

The temperature. Just remember, in the height of summer it can be 30 plus degrees, and in the winter it can easily drop to minus 20. Wear layers in the winter.

Poland is a mainly a Catholic country, and Catholics enjoy large families. The plane ride there and back can be like sitting in an infant school classroom with no teachers. The sound of incessant crying and screaming from tired and grizzly children will accompany you on your flight, both ways, whether you like it or not.

You need to be quite mobile and have a good level of fitness to be able to access some of the attractions here. There is little warning. Best to pack comfortable walking shoes.

Book up your visits in the many tourist information offices around the centre. It’s far cheaper than hotel prices and very good service.

You are expected to tip. However, some places take advantage of the tourists. You pay for a meal/drink in notes and there is often no intention of bringing you any change.

Worth a visit? A resounding ‘Yes’ to that. And it makes a change for us Brits to see our pound go so far. That’s not to say it’s cheap in Krakow, but it is noticeably cheaper. Don’t spend your time in the main square. Go round the nearest corner and enjoy great food, fabulous wine, and still have change for cake and a vodka. Recommended.

Fine Dining · Scunthorpe

San Pietro: the return

After our previous restaurant disappointment we decided on a belated birthday treat with family and return to San Pietro in Scunthorpe, North Lincolnshire. We weren’t disappointed with our decision.

I really can’t praise this Sicilian-influenced restaurant enough with their high levels of quality and service. I know it’s expensive (for us) and personally will always be a treat for special occasions, but you can always depend on their delicious Mediterranean-inspired food and the service. Who wouldn’t enjoy high-end dining in beautiful contemporary surroundings, and be treated as special guests by the staff and the amazing chef? What’s not to like about being warmly welcomed at the door and shown into the seating area for pre-meal drinks and olives, to peruse the menu at your leisure? And I love the fact that the owner/chef Pietro Catalano always seems to have time for his guests. But don’t mention his olive trees. You’ll be there for some time.

Our chosen starters were Whitby crab with green apple, pickled kohlrabi radish, creme fraiche and rice cracker. And king prawn, cherry tomato and chilli tagliolini. Delightful.

Enrico continued to fill our glasses and left just enough time before bringing out the main courses; one Roast rump of lamb with Sicilian caponata, Parmesan risotto and mint salsa, two 35-day aged fillet steaks with potato and mushroom terrine, crispy shallots, wilted spinach and Marsala jus and one special salmon with asparagus risotto. With four clean plates there were no complaints here.

Even though we were getting quite full at this point we were very comfortable and not quite ready to head home so ordered desert. Enrico topped up our glasses again and said to let him know when we were ready and brought us a tasty lemon meringue palette cleanser and a chocolate birthday message while we chatted.

For desert we chose; one creme brule, two lavender panna cotta with strawberry jelly, strawberry salad and strawberry sorbet and one cheese selection served with crackers, grapes, dates and honey. Enrico served the cheese at the table and was happy to provide a sample to help you choose, with extra crackers later.

I am not here to gush about all of San Pietro’s other services. That’s for you to discover. But it’s high time the chef of this gem of a restaurant was rightly awarded a Michelin star. What else is there to say about San Pietro except maybe the downside is that it is so popular. Book early for dinner or you may be disappointed.

Fine Dining · Lincoln

Castle Hotel Reform restaurant

Birthday approaching, and after scouring fine dining restaurants in our area, and finding them all booked up, we decided to venture slightly further afield. And up popped the Reform restaurant in the city of Lincoln, Lincolnshire, on the internet. With its grand website extolling the virtues of its award-winning chef and restaurant in the upper area of central Lincoln, we decided to give it a go. It looked and sounded amazing. But was it?

We made our way through the main entrance to the impressive Castle Hotel and ordered a cocktail at the bar. A rather miniscule and sad looking Prosecco and Cassis made its less than impressive appearance on the bar. A half measure lost in a small champagne flute. That cost £9. Well, it was upmarket Lincoln with city costs, and it was a special occasion, so we tried to put the expense to one side, and get on with the experience. Bex managed to eke out the cocktail for a few minutes and then entered the restaurant. I’ve got to say that the decor was fine dining quality; understated and tranquil. The only thing to set alarm bells ringing was that this was a Saturday night and outside Lincoln was buzzing with tourists and locals, with small, enticing restaurants overflowing with happy punters. The Reform had seating for around fifty people. We joined four other diners.

we didn’t have a table cloth !

That said, and to be fair to the Reform, we counted fourteen more diners, probably hotel guests, who came in later on in the evening, but even so…

We were given a menu, which I hoped was not the a la carte one. It was. I could already feel the disappointment welling up in my stomach. So, what was wrong?

The actual menu itself, and the font used, looked like a typical seaside cafe menu. We half expected to see toasted teacakes and all-day breakfasts on it. A small but important point that just lowered the tone. The staff, though friendly, needed a uniform. Well they had, sort of. They wore black, but not uniform. The male waiter looked to me like he’d just been driving a lorry. New trousers please, and a fitted shirt that wasn’t hanging out from his waistband.The person whom I took to be the manager wore ‘cargo’ style trousers. The trainee girl, who did her best to cope, wore the obligatory young teenager uniform of pelmet-length skirt and thick black tights. Unfair of me? It all just seemed so uninspiring.

To the food. The options were sort of OK but unexciting. No wow factor in the few dishes, and our choice was more choosing the best of not a lot. Maybe it was just us, I don’t know. It was, in essence, gastro pub food. But anyway, moving on… a small piece of bread accompanied by three types of butter/spread. Sounds grand but really wasn’t. Then we chose Tikka cured salmon as a starter. This consisted of three slivers of salmon with delicious home made lime pickle and a cucumber and mint raita. Neither of us could taste the Tikka part. Three forkfulls and it was gone. So we waited hungrily for our main.

I chose braised blade of Linconshire beef with three times cooked chips. To be honest, they really needed to be cooked a fourth time. Included on the plate was a croquette, lettuce and half a tomato. Bex chose warm tart of goats cheese. The pastry was a little too dry and the filling not particularly tasty. It didn’t come with anything and there were only three side dishes to chose from; chips, green beans and rocket salad. Not really worth £16 we thought. Both dishes looked OK but that’s about all. Noticeable was the lack of potatoes and veg on the menu. It was chips or nothing, which we thought strange for a ‘high end’ place. Maybe it was the award winning chefs night off!

After the restaurant became busier (about a third full), the service went rapidly downhill. So hungry were we that we decided on a pudding. We waited and waited for attention but none was forthcoming. We gave up, paid ( in our view) a very expensive bill for not a lot, and left hungry and dissatisfied, reflecting on the fact that they just couldn’t have coped with any more guests.

As is so often the case nowadays, the professionally designed websites promise so much. They over-promote and exaggerate. That’s marketing for you, and that’s the name of the game. It’s all about pushing an image whilst totally forgetting the substance. The Reform is a case in point. Lovely restaurant, amazing location, and well-meaning staff, but the whole point of the place, which is serving and providing delicious food, seems lost. Different food choices, a better chef, more staff, AND MORE FOOD for the money would make a difference. I am not a greedy person at all, I promise you that, but truthfully I got home and had a sandwich and a bar of chocolate, and I’ve never done that before.

This is the first restaurant I have ever given the thumbs down to. Maybe they just had an off night, but they really need to have a look round and see how other restaurants are doing it, for their own sake. It should be amazing because it say’s so on the website. In our opinion It really wasn’t.